Trillium (Trillium Ovatum)

Trillium (Trillium Ovatum)
Trillium (Trillium Ovatum)

Trillium’s are found throughout the forest of the Pacific Northwest. Usually found under the cover of larger trees in a small clearing, the Trillium starts blooming in March and April.

The three spade shaped leaves and the pure white three petal flower give the Trillium a striking contrast with the forest background.

Trillium (Trillium Ovatum)
Trillium (Trillium Ovatum)

In the lower picture, if you look closely, you may be able to see little drops of fine yellow powdery pollen. The small yellow splashes are on the lower petal.

The Trillium is a member of the Lily family.

Black Cottonwood (Populus Trichocarpa)

United States National Champion Black Cottonwood, Willamette Mission State Park
United States National Champion Black Cottonwood, Willamette Mission State Park

Pictured in early April is our nation’s largest Black Cottonwood (Populus Trichocarpa).

Standing 158′ high it is over 110′ wide. The circumference at the base of the trunk is over 27′. It is estimated to be about 265 years old.

Black Cottonwood’s are common in the western United States. They can be found all along the banks of Oregon’s Willamette River.  The Black Cottonwood is also knows as the Balsam Cottonwood or Western Balsam Poplar.

The picture shown had to be taken from over one hundred feet away, it does not show the true magnitude of this tree’s giant size.

List of Pacific Northwest Plants

Trillium(679)Med
The Pacific Northwest has it’s own special species as well as common plants, trees and wildflowers. Below is an incomplete list of a few plants and wildflowers you may find as you travel and visit the outdoors.

Click on the links below for pictures and more detailed information.

Daytrails recommends “Plants of the Pacific Northwest” by Jim Pojar.  It is a great help when trying to identify the many species of plants that grow in the Pacific Northwest.